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Posts Tagged ‘Planning’

Gardening, done well, is at least 50% preparation. Once you realize what you should have done, it’s probably too late for this year. So, having a garden journal is invaluable to for successful planning for next year.

Here are a few things to look out for this spring, and steps to make next year even better:

  1. A Blank Slate – By fall when the bulb catalogues arrive, it’s easy to forget where you planted what. Take photos and use inconspicuous plant markers to remind yourself where you have clusters of daffodils or where you meant to add that globe allium. (Geek tip: If you use Evernote to capture random ideas on your smartphone or tablet, the Skitch app lets you easily annotate photos right on your device.)
  2. Color Me Beautiful – Love it or hate it, flowering shrubs give spring in New England a distinctive palette. Yellow forsythia, mauve ‘PJM’ rhododendrons,  lilac magnolias, scarlet quince, and a range of cherry-blossom pinks. If you have mature flowering shrubs on your property, take note of the color and bloom time, and build bulb and perennial planting around a similar color family. For instance, forsythia could take tulips in loud, saturated reds and oranges, or contrast with more subdued purples and blues of scilla, hyacinth, and periwinkle.   tulips, hyacinth, squill and forsythia forsythia, parrot tulips, hyacinth, ranunculus
  3. The Grass Is Always Greener – After doing a spring clean-up and seeing bare patches where last year’s crabgrass died out or there is too much shade, one’s inclination is always to want to rip up the whole yard and start from scratch. Don’t. Spread some compost and grass seed now, but wait to do major renovations until late August, when  the grass seed will stand a chance against weeds. The one exception: if you have a shady area where grass is patch, and you are ready to develop it into a planting bed, its easiest to do it in spring while you are edging and mulching beds.
  4. Seedy Characters – Want to start a veggie garden, but don’t want to wait to buy expensive seedlings at the farmer’s market? Plan ahead next winter so that you can start your seeds in time. Here’s a nifty seed starting calculator from Margaret Roach at AWaytoGarden.com to tell you when and how to start what in your zone.

toddler & mom planting seeds

What did you remember to do this spring? What do you want to remember for next year? Let us know in the comments!

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Harvest Day

In response to the current edible-landscaping craze, we’ve planted and maintained a few vegetable gardens this year.  Today, the last of the goodies came inside — a crop of carrots, radishes, and other cool-season veggies. There are still some good-looking kale, parsley, and bokchoy out there in containers, and it’s time for potted herbs to come indoors.

If you are dreaming of starting or enlarging your own garden next spring, now is a good time to start planning.  The Greenfield Cooperative Exchange offers a great vegetable garden primer targeting northeastern crops and timing. No soil?  No problem.  Here’s a list of beginners’ crops well-suited to container gardening.

Seed catalogs are starting to arrive in the mail to tempt us.  Some good ones:

Seed Savers Exchange – Heirloom Varieties

Seeds of Change – Organic seed and tons of gardening information

High Mowing Seeds – Organic & heirloom seeds, cover crops

 

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